Potato Skin

parcelhare:

Orchid Mantis (Hymenopus coronatus) - Malaysia

From Wikipedia:

This species is characterized by brilliant and beautiful coloring and unusual structure; their four walking legs resemble flower petals, and the coloration of the bodies tends to match the environment in which they were raised. H. coronatus shows some of the most pronounced sexual dimorphism of any species of mantis; the males are generally less than half the size of the females. Young nymphs resemble ants with orange and black bodies. As the mantis grows in its environment, its color comes to more closely match the coloration of its surroundings with each passing molt. It has been theorized that humidity and intensity of light play a large role in the final coloration of the adult.

(Various photos from Google Images)

(via rhamphotheca)

explosionsoflife:

This adorable spider is commonly known as the Peacock Jumping Spider (Maratus volans), for obvious reasons. Similar to actual peacocks, male peacock spiders raise a colorful flap on their abdomens to garner female attention. Also common among this species is a sort of spider polygamy where male peacock spiders court multiple females at once.

explosionsoflife:

This adorable spider is commonly known as the Peacock Jumping Spider (Maratus volans), for obvious reasons. Similar to actual peacocks, male peacock spiders raise a colorful flap on their abdomens to garner female attention. Also common among this species is a sort of spider polygamy where male peacock spiders court multiple females at once.

(via rhamphotheca)

rhamphotheca:

 Orbweaver Encyosaccus sexmaculatus  from Amazonian Ecuador (in the East)… 
(photo: Asser @ Archnoboards)

rhamphotheca:

 Orbweaver Encyosaccus sexmaculatus  from Amazonian Ecuador (in the East)… 

(photo: Asser @ Archnoboards)

(Source: coopdaddyswag)

rhamphotheca:

Defensive display by a Spiny Katydid (Panacanthus cuspidatus) from Yasuni National Park in Amazonian Ecuador.
(photo: Santiago Ron)

rhamphotheca:

Defensive display by a Spiny Katydid (Panacanthus cuspidatus) from Yasuni National Park in Amazonian Ecuador.

(photo: Santiago Ron)

wiseignorance:

Phanaeus vindex - Rainbow Scarab Beetle
The Rainbow Scarab Beetle is an American species ranging from the Atlantic Ocean to the Rocky Mountains. They grow up to 1 inch long, and are dung beetles. Only the males have horns. Overall one the most colorful and awesome bugs in America.
Photo ©DT Almquist 2012, all rights reserved

wiseignorance:

Phanaeus vindex - Rainbow Scarab Beetle

The Rainbow Scarab Beetle is an American species ranging from the Atlantic Ocean to the Rocky Mountains. They grow up to 1 inch long, and are dung beetles. Only the males have horns. Overall one the most colorful and awesome bugs in America.

Photo ©DT Almquist 2012, all rights reserved

(via rhamphotheca)

rhamphotheca:

Newly Discovered Species:  Parasitic Wasp
This new species of parasitic wasp cruises at just under a half-inch (1 centimeter) above the ground in Madrid, Spain, in search of its target: ants. With a target in sight, the teensy wasp attacks from the air like a tiny dive-bomber, depositing an egg in less than one-20th of a second.
(via: Live Science)         (photo: C. Van Achterberg)

rhamphotheca:

Newly Discovered Species:  Parasitic Wasp

This new species of parasitic wasp cruises at just under a half-inch (1 centimeter) above the ground in Madrid, Spain, in search of its target: ants. With a target in sight, the teensy wasp attacks from the air like a tiny dive-bomber, depositing an egg in less than one-20th of a second.

(via: Live Science)         (photo: C. Van Achterberg)

rhamphotheca:

Lichens on a dead twig in my yard in Austin. We have had a lot of rain and the lichen fruiting bodies have sprouted.
(photo/text: Jim McCulloch | Flickr)

rhamphotheca:

Lichens on a dead twig in my yard in Austin. We have had a lot of rain and the lichen fruiting bodies have sprouted.

(photo/text: Jim McCulloch | Flickr)